The Art Within Problematic American Democracy

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NextGen Climate

One day when I was taking time, as I do daily, to check in with Professor Long’s blog, I unexpectedly fell upon the exact video that I watched on November 7th, 2017. Flashback to that night, with a tight grip on my partners hand, I rest my head on his shoulder, slowly and in sync we inhaled and exhaled; it was election day. At this point I had experienced several months where, to my disappointment, not even music had been able to ease my worried mind. But in that moment, in a cramped college apartment, staring at the stickers on the coffee table displaying tag lines like “Friends don’t let friends vote Trump,” “Stand. Defend. Protect. Land, Water, Home” and “I love beer and I love clean water”  we were watching the numbers roll in, and the reality with it, so we turned away from the news and drowned out the noise with this Simon & Garfunkel song. From that moment and beyond the song has reminded me of the beauty of American democracy and the art that is comes as a product of it. It would take a few months of passionate contemplation, assessing and averting fear, to become the cock-eyed optimist that I had always known myself to be, but as I look back now on what pushed me through this perplexing period I know others shared with me, I can relate them all back to American democracy. It was music, Nahko’s Love Letters To God, Trevor Hall’s Standing Rock, and the song below from Simon & Garfunkel. It was the literature of Walt Whitman and De Toqueville. It was speeches by Emerson and Williams, and the poetry of Adrienne Rich in her book An Atlas of a Difficult World. It was film, documentaries like Waiting For Superman (2010) or Inequality for All (2013). It was research papers of James Lull and the deep, complex, and important conversations surrounding these types of works. It was art, the freedom that we are allowed, the freedom to share political messages and emotional experiences in this Open Space of Democracy that push individuals like myself to persevere, questioning and challenging this society. Our society is capitalistic and democratic; it is not ideal, not even close. The most pressing issue for us today is that those in power invest in profit. Instead, we must capitalize on our right to free speech and invest in education and in art, the entities that allow diverse individuals to grow, feel, and think. These are the key components that motivate individuals to continuously create new and better life for all to experience.

“(And) you are taking a moment to consider another interesting moment of creative democratic practice in your satchel of cultural history: the performance of the song “America” in September 1981 by Simon and Garfunkel, performed as part of the free benefit concert on the Great Lawn in New York’s Central Park that brought out 500,00 people to listen to music in the rain” – Mark Long (Professor)

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